From zero to sixty through a butteryfly needle

Last week, when I was diagnosed with depression, the doctor also ordered some bloodwork to test my thyroid. He was concerned about my weight gain, which could have been a side-effect of an abnormally functioning thyroid (as well as the depression). My thyroid test came back okay, but there was a red flag. My blood sugar was higher than it should have been. I had a sweet breakfast that morning and I thought that must have been the cause of the high test results.

After an eight hour fast I had more blood drawn yesterday. It was, as always, a painful experience. I have always had deep veins in my arms and the most reliable way to get a good draw is to use one from my hand – using the butterfly needle. It makes the experience one to remember.

The nurse called with the results today; they weren’t what I was expecting. My blood sugar was lower than the first test, but not low enough. They’ve diagnosed (oh how I am beginning to dislike that word) me with borderline diabetes. It’s something that runs in my family but I never considered to be a possibility. There is a long, rough road ahead of me now. I’ve always been on the heavy side. It’s gotten out of hand over the past few years, though, and this medical issue are a direct result of that. The doctor has put me on a diet of 1,500 calories a day, with the goal of eventually losing 100 pounds.

I’m viewing this as an opportunity. I’m lucky that this was detected now and not in ten years when it could be full-blown diabetes. It’s reversible now. This requires a severe lifestyle change. The way I live and eat has to change. It’s not going to be easy. It’s going to be a challenge unlike any other I’ve faced but, with the support of family and friends, I know I can get get through it and I will be better for it.

6 thoughts on “From zero to sixty through a butteryfly needle

  1. Hey man. I saw your post in the PWLT, and I was going to comment, but then I forgot. 1,000 calories a day is okay, but your body is going to go into starvation mode, whereupon your metabolism is drastically slowed. Your body will begin to hoard all of the calories that it can, and your weight loss will actually be slower than if you kept your metabolism high. A rule of thumb is consuming 600-800 calories less than your normal intake for the first four weeks or so. After that, cut that down to about 300-400 calories below your normal intake. This will keep your body from switching into starvation mode — which as I said, will ultimately slow your progress. Early-morning cardio workouts are best as well. At this point in time, your body has no food supply, and thus must go to its reserves: fat. Remember that for the first few months that you’re getting into shape, fat burning is at its max beyond the 20-minute mark. If you’re like Lance Armstrong, fat burning begins almost immediately, but one must be in incredibly good shape to begin with. You’ll get there eventually, but not right away. Remember, anything beyond a 60-minute workout, and your body is metabolizing muscle tissue, not fat. Follow up an early-morning cardio workout with a lean breakfast. As a rule, try to avoid carbohydrates so your body will be forced to use fat as its fuel source as much as possibly. Try to avoid high-fructose corn syrup as well; it slows the metabolism. Drink water all day, and with every meal. Even juices have an incredibly high number of calories. Eat throughout the day to keep your metabolism in full-swing.

    Whatever you decide, good luck. :)

  2. Hey man. I saw your post in the PWLT, and I was going to comment, but then I forgot. 1,000 calories a day is okay, but your body is going to go into starvation mode, whereupon your metabolism is drastically slowed. Your body will begin to hoard all of the calories that it can, and your weight loss will actually be slower than if you kept your metabolism high. A rule of thumb is consuming 600-800 calories less than your normal intake for the first four weeks or so. After that, cut that down to about 300-400 calories below your normal intake. This will keep your body from switching into starvation mode — which as I said, will ultimately slow your progress. Early-morning cardio workouts are best as well. At this point in time, your body has no food supply, and thus must go to its reserves: fat. Remember that for the first few months that you’re getting into shape, fat burning is at its max beyond the 20-minute mark. If you’re like Lance Armstrong, fat burning begins almost immediately, but one must be in incredibly good shape to begin with. You’ll get there eventually, but not right away. Remember, anything beyond a 60-minute workout, and your body is metabolizing muscle tissue, not fat. Follow up an early-morning cardio workout with a lean breakfast. As a rule, try to avoid carbohydrates so your body will be forced to use fat as its fuel source as much as possibly. Try to avoid high-fructose corn syrup as well; it slows the metabolism. Drink water all day, and with every meal. Even juices have an incredibly high number of calories. Eat throughout the day to keep your metabolism in full-swing.

    Whatever you decide, good luck. :)

  3. Oh, man — I hear you about the needles. I’ve tried to donate blood, and after macerating both arms the nurses told me that I’m probably not a good candidate because my veins are impossible. Since I have to get a blood stick at least once a year for my thyroid, this is always a special event — I’ve gotten to the point where I beg them to just take it out of my hand, too.

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